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Thinking Outside the Cage
Towards a Nonspeciesist Paradigm for Scientific Research

A Conference to be held at Queen's University, Kingston, Canada
March 27-28, 2014

UPDATE — Conference Report and Next Steps

On March 27-28, 2014, the Animals in Philosophy, Politics, Law and Ethics program at Queen's University hosted a conference on the ethics, politics and law of animal research in Canada entitled “Thinking Outside the Cage: Towards a Nonspeciesist Paradigm for Scientific Research”. The conference was intended to encourage critical reflection on the limits of existing regulations, and to inspire creative thinking about alternative frameworks and effective avenues to change. We invited leading scientists, public policy experts, humane educators, legal scholars and political theorists to help us identify the opportunities and challenges involved in pursuing a new ethical, legal and political framework regarding animals in research and education. This Report seeks to summarize some of the key themes of the conference, and to identify possible next steps.

Click here for the full report.

Sponsorship

This conference is organized by the Animals in Philosophy, Politics, Law and Ethics program at Queen's University, Kingston (http://www.queensu.ca/philosophy/varia/APPLE.html). Funding is generously provided by the Abby Benjamin Postdoctoral Fellowship, and the Queen's Forum for Philosophy and Public Policy.

Format

We begin on Thursday evening, March 27th with a public lecture and film screening, which is free and open to the public. On Friday, March 28th , we will host a full-day conference for which advance registration is required.

Conference Aims

As organizers of this conference, we are committed to a non-speciesist research ethics. Such an ethics denies that humans have a right to use sentient animals as subjects of harmful research for our benefit, and therefore requires the same legal and regulatory safeguards regarding the use of animal subjects in research as for the use of human subjects. Questions regarding the treatment of animals within academic institutions are matters of public responsibility, and should be subject to democratic deliberation by the larger community.

This is a long-term goal, and the conference is intended to encourage critical reflection on the limits of existing regulations, and to inspire creative thinking about alternative frameworks and effective avenues to change. We have invited leading scientists, public policy experts, humane educators, legal scholars and political theorists to help us identify the opportunities and challenges involved in pursuing a new ethical, legal and political framework regarding animals in research.

 

Conference Co-organizers:

Sue Donaldson
Will Kymlicka
Zipporah Weisberg